Core Functionality

Andrew Griesmer | November 24, 2014

Importing meshes into COMSOL Multiphysics is often necessary when interfacing between different programs. With COMSOL Multiphysics version 5.0, these meshes can be converted into solid geometry objects for further investigation and modeling capabilities. You can also perform boolean operations on the new geometry for CFD, electromagetics, and acoustics applications.

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Chien Liu | November 19, 2014

This is an introduction to the weak form for those of us who didn’t grow up using finite element analysis and vector calculus in our daily lives, but are nevertheless interested in learning about the weak form, with the help of some physical intuition and basic calculus.

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Andrew Griesmer | November 5, 2014

Around this time last year, we introduced a new ribbon user interface to COMSOL Multiphysics. Now, with version 5.0, we are introducing many improvements that make COMSOL Multiphysics more intuitive to use. Updates include a change in color scheme, additional multiphysics interfaces, a materials tab, global materials, and Material Sweeps and Function Sweeps.

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Lexi Carver | October 29, 2014

Last month, my colleague Ruud described some of the most effective ways to use arrow plots in your COMSOL Multiphysics simulation results. In this next installment of the postprocessing series, I’ll continue with slice plots, which are an easy way to visualize physics behavior on many different parts of your model.

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Walter Frei | October 24, 2014

One of the most common questions we get is: How large of a model can you solve in COMSOL Multiphysics? It turns out that this is quite tricky to answer decisively, so in this blog entry, we will talk about memory requirements, model size, and how you can predict the amount of memory you will need for solving large 3D finite element problems.

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Ruud Börger | September 30, 2014

In a recent blog post, Lexi explained how to best use line, surface, and volume plots. We will now look into arrow plots and how you can use these to your advantage. After a beginner’s guide, you’ll get a “look in the kitchen” via a very interesting industrial application where arrow plots played a crucial design role in winning a consulting assignment.

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Lexi Carver | September 1, 2014

Plotting visual simulation results on a model geometry is a great way to unveil the sometimes-mysterious physics happening behind the scenes in a device. Like learning a language, knowing how to use postprocessing tools helps designers investigate and understand their designs and processes more fully. Surface, volume, and line plots are three of the most common plot types used in postprocessing, and are applicable to many simulations.

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Mranal Jain | August 26, 2014

Creating animations is an effective way to present and visualize simulation results. In COMSOL Multiphysics, this is fairly straightforward using the Player node for time-dependent or parameter sweep study types. But, can we animate how the solution changes along a direction in a 3D steady-state model? The answer is yes. Here, we will learn how to combine parallel slices to create an animation for a 3D steady-state example model, using a three-step process.

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Wei Guo | July 30, 2014

We have all experienced the boredom and frustration of being stuck in a traffic jam. Very often, traffic congestion comes and goes for no obvious reason. Employing the analogy to gas dynamics, we can now simulate traffic flow using the equation-based modeling capabilities of COMSOL Multiphysics and gain a better understanding of why congestion happens.

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Temesgen Kindo | July 28, 2014

In a previous blog entry, we discussed the join feature in COMSOL Multiphysics in the context of stationary problems. Here, we will address parametric, eigenfrequency, frequency domain, and time-dependent problems. Additionally, we will compare and contrast the built-in with and at operators versus solution joining.

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Temesgen Kindo | July 1, 2014

In engineering analysis, the need to compare solutions obtained under different circumstances frequently arises. Some possible scenarios include comparing the effect of different load or parameter configurations, and enveloping results to find the worst or best case at each point of the domain. In each of these and other similar cases, you need access to more than one data set. Here’s how to accomplish such tasks using COMSOL Multiphysics.

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