Design Materials to Exhibit Wanted Properties

Phil Kinnane April 24, 2012

I’ve just been reading my favorite news service, www.physorg.com, and noticed that cloaking is once again the topic of the day. While we have previously reported on a group out of Duke University, this article mentions a group from Ames Laboratory in Iowa. Similar to the Duke Group, Costas Soukoulis from Ames Laboratory also seems to have been at the forefront of this research.

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Phil Kinnane April 12, 2012

We first noticed that COMSOL was being used to model cloaking when an article on BBC’s website was brought to our attention. It related to a paper published by a famous scientist, Sir John Pendry, in Science. In it, he and his two co-authors, David Smith and David Schurig at Duke University, NC, laid out the theory for the cloaking of light and postulated that “a simple demonstration model that could work for radar might be possible within 18 months’ […]

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Phil Kinnane April 4, 2012

I had previously blogged about Thermal Cloaking, which uses layers of aluminum and paper to create an anisotropic structure and cloak a desired object. This differs from the “traditional” type of cloaking, of light and electromagnetic waves, which make use of metamaterials or layered structures that impose a negative refractive index to make the cloaked object appear transparent.

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Phil Kinnane March 30, 2012

A couple of days ago I blogged about the team at Lahey Clinic who are using COMSOL Multiphysics to model their neuromodulation therapy of patients. In their example, they place electrodes close to the spine and, through electric current, stimulate the area around these electrodes to relieve back pain. The reason why modeling is important for them is because it’s quite difficult to actually access these treatments to measure their effectiveness and possible detriments.

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Phil Kinnane March 27, 2012

As an avid reader of the physorg.com blog, I was pleasantly surprised to see a figure show up that could only have been made with COMSOL Multiphysics. Reading the article on thermal cloaking, I understood why.

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Phil Kinnane March 26, 2012

A second user story for the next COMSOL News is also reaching completion with exciting results (read about the first one here). This is an interesting case as it wasn’t really a group of people traditionally associated with finite element that managed to perform some pretty sophisticated modeling. In fact two of them are medical doctors while the final one has his background in physics.

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Phil Kinnane March 14, 2012

These last couple of months I’ve been working together with some of our users to get the next COMSOL News together. I’ve just finished working with a great application and I thought I’d give you a sneak preview of it.

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Phil Kinnane March 8, 2012

Many devices live with a dry, technical name that either basically says what the device does, or is an acronym of that dry, technical name. Very few get a nickname that sticks to become the industry standard.

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Phil Kinnane March 5, 2012

Someone who saw my RFID model blog post from a few days back pointed me towards a site that talks just about RFIDs. On it, I discovered a lot of articles about using RFID in the biomedical industry. This was an application that I had never thought of before. I’d always associated RFIDs with security, tracking packages and the like.

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Phil Kinnane February 27, 2012

While thinking about the blog post I published previously, about the hemisphere spiral antenna, I came across this article about RFIDs. Radio Frequency Identifications are small, inexpensive chips, which use RF to send stored information while being fixed to almost any gadget or personal effect.

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Phil Kinnane February 24, 2012

Reading physorg.com, I came across this story about miniaturizing antennas for smaller wireless devices. Apparently, the size of the antenna often limits the size of the wireless device – so let’s make those antennas smaller. The article is about a group from the University of Michigan who achieves this by using a hemispherical substrate with a spiraling antenna taking advantage of the volume that the hemisphere provides.

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