The Application Gallery features COMSOL Multiphysics tutorial and demo app files pertinent to the electrical, mechanical, fluid, and chemical disciplines. You can download ready-to-use tutorial models and demo apps with step-by-step instructions for how to create them yourself. The examples in the gallery serve as a great starting point for your own simulation work.

Use the Quick Search to find tutorials and apps relevant to your area of expertise. Log in or create a COMSOL Access account that is associated with a valid COMSOL license to download the MPH-files.


Axisymmetric Transient Heat Transfer

This is a benchmark model for an axisymmetric transient thermal analysis. The temperature on the boundaries changes from 0 degrees C to 1000 degrees C at the start of the simulation. The temperature at 190 s from the anlysis is compared with a NAFEMS benchmark solution.

Thermal Fatigue of a Surface Mount Resistor

A surface mount resistor is subjected to thermal cycling. The difference in the thermal expansion of different materials will introduce stresses in the structure. The solder which connects the resistor with the printed circuit board is seen as the weakest link in the assembly. It responds nonlinearly to changes in both temperature and time. In order to ensure the structural integrity of the ...

Freeze-Drying

Freeze-drying, or lyophilization, is a process for drying heat-sensitive substances such as foods, blood plasma, and antibiotics. The wet substance is frozen and then, through sublimation, ice (or some other frozen solvent) is removed in the presence of a high vacuum. This example models the process of ice sublimation in a vial under vacuum-chamber conditions, a test case for many freeze-drying ...

The Magnus Effect

The Magnus effect explains the curl that soccer players can give the ball, resulting in the enjoyable goals that we can see in every World Cup™. This model looks at the Magnus effect in the laminar and turbulent flow regimes for transient and stationary flows. It also discusses the simulation results and relates them to experimental measurements on soccer balls found in the literature.

Surface Micromachined Accelerometer

This model shows how to simulate a capacitively actuated surface micromachined accelerometer, using the Electromechanics Interface. It is based on a case study from the book Microsystem Design by Stephen D. Senturia (Kluwer Academic Publishers, 5th Edition, 2003, pages 513-525).

Mixing of Water in a Flat Bottom Mixer

This tutorial example simulates the flow in a flat bottom mixer containing, agitated by a pitched four blade impeller, where the fluid is water, and flow is assumed to be turbulent. The flow in the mixer is modeled using the k-ε turbulence model, and a time-dependent simulation corresponding to 30 revolutions of the impeller is performed in order to reach the operating conditions of the mixer. ...

Steady-State 1D Heat Transfer with Radiation

The example shows a 1D steady-state thermal analysis including radiation to a prescribed ambient temperature. The temperature field from the solution of this benchmark model is compared with a NAFEMS benchmark solution.

MOSFET with Mobility Models

This model shows how to add several linked mobility models to the simple MOSFET example.

Solar Dish Receiver

A paraboloidal dish can concentrate solar energy onto a target (receiver), resulting in very high local heat fluxes. This can be used to generate steam, which can be used to power a generator, or hydrogen, which can be used directly as a fuel source. In this model, the heat flux arriving on the receiver as a function of radial position is computed and compared with published values. Corrections ...

Conical Quantum Dot

Quantum dots are nano- or microscale devices created by confining free electrons in a 3D semiconducting matrix. Those tiny islands or droplets of confined “free electrons” (those with no potential energy) present many interesting electronic properties. They are of potential importance for applications in quantum computing, biological labeling, or lasers, to name only a few. Quantum dots can ...